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JOE LOUIS ARENA, DETROIT, MICHIGAN, 28 MARZO 1988 - 3CD - OFICIAL SONIDO DEFINITIVO

JOE LOUIS ARENA, DETROIT, MICHIGAN, 28 MARZO 1988. Editado de los archivos de Bruce Springsteen. El sonido definitivo. 3CD oficiales. Grabado por Toby Scott. Mezclado por Jon Altschiller. ¡Atención: Se edita en CD a mediados de marzo de 2020. El plazo de entrega es de 2-3 semanas! 

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JOE LOUIS ARENA, DETROIT, MICHIGAN, 28 MARZO 1988.

Editado de los archivos de Bruce Springsteen.

El sonido definitivo. 3CD oficiales.

Grabado por Toby Scott. Mezclado por Jon Altschiller.

¡Atención: Se edita en CD a mediados de marzo de 2020. El plazo de entrega es de 2-3 semanas!



Un excelente ejemplo de la gira Tunnel Of Love Express Tour en su forma más pura, el 28/03/88 de Detroit sirve como escaparate de las canciones clave del álbum, incluyendo "Two Faces", "All That Heaven Will Allow", "Spare Parts", "Brilliant Disguise"," Tougher Than The Rest"," One Step Up",y "Walk Like A Man", editada por primera vez editada oficialmente en direct. El conjunto de 30 canciones también presenta una versión de "Love Me Tender" de Elvis Presley y "Detroit Medley", además de un tema extra, "Reason To Believe", grabada de la prueba de sonido, canción que nunca fue tocada en directo en la gira del Tunnel.

A stunning snapshot of the Tunnel Of Love Express Tour in its purest form, Detroit 3/28/88 serves as a showcase for the album’s key songs including “Two Faces,” “All That Heaven Will Allow, “Spare Parts,” “Brilliant Disguise,” “Tougher Than The Rest, “One Step Up,” the title track and most notably the first live archive release of “Walk Like A Man.” The 30-song set also features a cover of Elvis Presley’s “Love Me Tender” and the “Detroit Medley,” plus a bonus soundcheck performance of “Reason To Believe,” a song which never appeared in a Tunnel show. 

Soundcheck: REASON TO BELIEVE

TUNNEL OF LOVE / BE TRUE / ADAM RAISED A CAIN / TWO FACES / ALL THAT HEAVEN WILL ALLOW / SEEDS / ROULETTE / COVER ME / BRILLIANT DISGUISE / SPARE PARTS / WAR / BORN IN THE U.S.A. / TOUGHER THAN THE REST / AIN'T GOT YOU - SHE'S THE ONE / YOU CAN LOOK (BUT YOU BETTER NOT TOUCH) / I'M A COWARD / I'M ON FIRE / ONE STEP UP / PART MAN, PART MONKEY / WALK LIKE A MAN / DANCING IN THE DARK / LIGHT OF DAY / BORN TO RUN / HUNGRY HEART / GLORY DAYS / LOVE ME TENDER / ROSALITA (COME OUT TONIGHT) / DETROIT MEDLEY / RAISE YOUR HAND

"Part Man, Part Monkey" includes "Love Is Strange" in the outro. "Born To Run" is solo acoustic. "Detroit Medley" includes "I Hear A Train" and "Sweet Soul Music".

  • Bruce Springsteen - Lead vocals, guitar, harmonica; Roy Bittan - Piano, keyboards; Clarence Clemons - Tenor and baritone saxophones, percussion, backing vocal; Danny Federici - Organ, glockenspiel, keyboards; accordion; Nils Lofgren - Guitars, backing vocal; Patti Scialfa - Guitar, percussion, backing vocal; Garry Tallent - Bass; Max Weinberg - Drums
  • Additional musicians: Mario Cruz – Tenor saxophone, backing vocal; Ed Manion – Baritone saxophone, backing vocal; Mark Pender - Trumpet, backing vocal; Richie "La Bamba" Rosenberg - Trombone, backing vocal; Mike Spengler – Trumpet, backing vocal
  • Also appearing as the Ringmaster – Terry Magovern
  • Recorded live to 24-track digital by Toby Scott, assisted by Paul du Gré
  • Mixed by Jon Altschiller from Digital PCM multitracks; Additional engineering by Danielle Warman
  • Reason To Believe recorded during soundcheck before the show
  • Mastered to DSD and PCM by Jon Altschiller
  • Post Production by Brad Serling and Micah Gordon
  • Artwork Design by Michelle Holme
  • Cover Photo by 
  • Tour Director: George Travis
  • Jon Landau Management: Jon Landau, Barbara Carr, Jan Stabile and Alison Oscar
  • HD Files are 24-bit/48kHz; Audiophile DSD files are DSD64

Gotta Sing A New Song, That’s My Job

Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band

Joe Louis Arena, Detroit, MI, March 28, 1988

By Erik Flannigan

The 1988 Tunnel of Love Express Tour was marked by material changes to the Springsteen concert baseline in place from 1978-1985. The band changed on-stage positions, setlist warhorses like “Badlands” and “Thunder Road” took a breather, and Bruce drafted in a horn section for the first time since 1977. But the true differentiator separating the ’88 tour from every other is its original narrative arc. A Tunnel performance was a blend of song selections, sequencing, and even on-stage elements that took the audience on a journey through the complex and nuanced world of adulthood and relationships: romantic, fraternal, and familial.

Bruce started Tunnel shows with an invitation along the lines of, “Are you ready to ride?” The visual metaphor on stage was that of an amusement park, implying a night of thrills, chills, and spills. Marketing for the tour intoned “This is not a dark ride,” but as Bruce wrote in “Tunnel of Love,” “the house is haunted and the ride gets rough.” Does it ever.

The Tunnel set, in story and song, explored adult life’s emotional ups and downs and the hard questions that arise when you recognize being in a deep committed relationship requires acknowledging your doubts and vulnerabilities.

At the time, the tour’s setlist rigidity raised eyebrows from longtime fans, though it did loosen up as the tour wore on. But in hindsight, the initial core setlist in the tour’s first several weeks can be seen one of Bruce’s most fully realized artistic visions. Detroit 3/28/88 captures the Tunnel of Love Express Tour in its purest form.

The first set in Detroit borders on perfection, opening with a stellar version of “Tunnel of Love” into “Be True,” the latter released as a live b-side from this performance. The River-era selection serves as a showcase for the Big Man, Clarence Clemons, who was at the top of his game on the tour and blows “Be True” beautifully. Patti Scialfa’s vocals are also on point.

The resurrection of “Adam Raised a Cain” for the first time since the Darkness tour is a long-awaited return, especially with the Tunnel of Love Horns adding heft to the performance and Bruce’s guitar pushed to the fore. In terms of familial relationships, “Adam” is one end of a father-son thread that will come back later in the show with “Walk Like a Man.” But before that there is other provocative ground to cover: introspection (“Two Faces”), companionship (“All That Heaven Will Allow”), oppressive outside forces (“Seeds,” “Roulette”), shelter from those storms (“Cover Me”), self-doubt (“Brilliant Disguise”), a mother’s doubt (“Spare Parts”), and lastly the lingering impact of the Vietnam War (“War,” “Born In the U.S.A.”).

The sequencing of the set is so strong that the transitions between tracks are as memorable as the songs themselves. “Tunnel” gives way to the soaring “Be True.” “Roulette” ends but “Cover Me” rises from the mist in the same key. The haunting keyboards that end “Cover Me” flow straight into “Brilliant Disguise.” Every song change has been thought through and rehearsed, or in some cases newly written. The stirring piano and synthesizer suite that serves as the music bed to the introduction of “Spare Parts” is one of my favorite musical elements of the entire tour, cinematic in scope and poignant in expression. Kudos Mr. Bittan and Mr. Federici.

The set ends with a brilliant “Born in the U.S.A.,” again showing that 1988 versions of the song are the most potent, driven by Bruce’s additional lyrics and storming guitar solo.

“Tougher Than the Rest” opens the second set on a majestic note and reminds us of its place among the very best songs Bruce has ever written. After a foray into longing via “Ain’t Got You” and “She’s the One,” the mood lightens with the playful and self-effacing “You Can’t Look (But You Better Not Touch)” and Gino Washington cover-turned-original (and ’88 tour exclusive)  “I’m a Coward.” The pairing of “I’m on Fire” with “One Step Up” is a trip into a particular male psyche, perhaps even the same character at two different stages of life.

“Part Man, Part Monkey” offers a humorous take on animal instincts before the overall narrative arc reaches its dénouement with “Walk Like a Man,” revisiting the father and son from “Adam Raised a Cain.” The resplendently detailed yet understated arrangement is augmented by horns and shows off the band’s vocal chops, too. Bruce’s singing stays true to the original, and there’s a real power in the sincerity of his performance.

The set ends with “Light of Day,” in a less refined, more exploratory form than later versions in ‘88. In fact, rather than bring closure, this “Light of Day” seems more a celebration of uncharted waters — the line that really stands out now, “Don’t ask me what I’m doing buddy, I don’t know,” lands like an overall commentary on the narrative that preceded it.

Standouts in the encore include “Love Me Tender,” which teeters on wedding band territory until you realize that Bruce is singing the hell out of it, and a free-flowing “Detroit Medley,” with Bruce calling out key changes and the band showing off their turn-on-a-dime prowess. The medley features “Sweet Soul Music,” which gives La Bamba & Co. one of the all-time great horn parts to chew on.

For dessert, we’re treated to the second soundcheck bonus track in the live archive series, “Reason to Believe.” While Tunnel of Love setlists had fewer variants than a typical Springsteen tour, 1988 soundchecks were often wide-ranging affairs, loaded with cover songs (some of which eventually found their way into the set) and other material. As cool as those covers could be, “Reason To Believe” is even more compelling.

The song regularly featured on the Born in the U.S.A. tour but was dropped when the show moved to stadiums. Here, Bruce and the band test drive a moody, horn-accented arrangement that is reminiscent of what they would do with Woody Guthrie’s “Vigilante Man” two months later at Madison Square Garden. Springsteen’s vocals and harp are resolute, the music swampy, and the end product a beguiling alternative take on one of Springsteen’s best and, as later versions attest most mutable songs.

Highs, lows, pathos, comedy, sin, redemption—the Tunnel of Love Express tour had it all, and on stage in Detroit, Bruce shared as much of himself in these rich, satisfying performances as he would do three decades later on Broadway.