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FIRST UNION CENTER, PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, 25 SEPTIEMBRE 1999 - 3CD - OFICIAL SONIDO DEFINITIVO

PHILADELPHIA '99. FIRST UNION CENTER, PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, 25 SEPTIEMBRE 1999. Editado de los archivos de Bruce Springsteen. El sonido definitivo. 3CD oficiales. Grabado por Toby Scott. Mezclado por Jon Altschiller. ¡Atención: Se edita en CD a mediados de julio de 2020. El plazo de entrega es de 2-3 semanas! 

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PHILADELPHIA '99.

FIRST UNION CENTER, PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, 25 SEPTIEMBRE 1999.

Editado de los archivos de Bruce Springsteen.

El sonido definitivo. 3CD oficiales.

Grabado por Toby Scott. Mezclado por Jon Altschiller.

¡Atención: Se edita en CD a mediados de julio de 2020. El plazo de entrega es de 2-3 semanas!

Una memorable serie de seis noches en la Ciudad del Amor Fraternal, que concluye con nota alta con algunos viejos amigos en Philadelphia '99. El set de 22 canciones comienza de una manera asombrosa con el tan esperado regreso de "Incident On 57th Street", tocado por última vez en diciembre de 1980, e incluye rarezas de la gira Tracks/Reunion como "Point Blank", "Sherry Darling", la oscarizada "Streets Of Philadelphia", "Jungleland" y "Raise Your Hand" para aparecer en el Archive Series. Philadelphia '99 también incluye una de las cinco interpretaciones de la épica "New York City Serenade" ofrecidas entre 1999-2000, tras un paréntesis de 24 años sin ser interpretada.

A memorable six-night stand in the City of Brotherly Love ends on a high note with some old friends on Philadelphia '99. The 22-song set begins in jaw-dropping fashion with the long-awaited return of “Incident On 57th Street,” last played in December 1980, and features the first Reunion tour performances of “Point Blank,” “Sherry Darling” “Streets of Philadelphia,” “Jungleland” and “Raise Your Hand” to appear in the Archive Series. Philadelphia ’99 also includes one of only five stagings of the epic “New York City Serenade” circa 1999-2000 following a 24-year hiatus.

Set-list:

INCIDENT ON 57TH STREET / THE TIES THAT BIND / PROVE IT ALL NIGHT / TWO HEARTS / ATLANTIC CITY / FACTORY / POINT BLANK / YOUNGSTOWN / MURDER INCORPORATED / BADLANDS / OUT IN THE STREET / TENTH AVENUE FREEZE-OUT / SHERRY DARLING / STREETS OF PHILADELPHIA / NEW YORK CITY SERENADE / LIGHT OF DAY / JUNGLELAND / BORN TO RUN / THUNDER ROAD / IF I SHOULD FALL BEHIND / LAND OF HOPE AND DREAMS / RAISE YOUR HAND (with Ali Weinberg)

Another incredible show. Sources say that the soundcheck and show was in part filmed. Surprise opener "Incident On 57th Street" is a tour premiere, last played in 1980. Set also includes "New York City Serenade" and the final tour performances of "Streets Of Philadelphia" and "Raise Your Hand". "Atlantic City" returns to the set after a short break; it was last played on July 24. "Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out" includes "It's All Right", "The Monkey Time", "Take Me To The River", "Red Headed Woman", and "My Girl". "Light Of Day" includes "You Can't Sit Down" and "I've Been Everywhere". Ali Weinberg features on keyboards on "Raise Your Hand".



  • Bruce Springsteen - Lead vocals, guitar, harmonica; Roy Bittan - Piano, keyboards; Clarence Clemons - Tenor and baritone saxophones, percussion, backing vocal; Danny Federici - Organ, keyboards; Nils Lofgren - Guitar, pedal steel, backing vocal; Patti Scialfa - Guitar, percussion, backing vocal; Garry Tallent - Bass; Stevie Van Zandt - Electric and acoustic guitars, mandolin, backing vocal; Max Weinberg - Drums
  • Recorded by Toby Scott and Ross Petersen
  • Mixed by Jon Altschiller from multi-track digital masters; Additional engineering by Danielle Warman
  • Mastered by Jon Altschiller
  • Post Production by Brad Serling and Micah Gordon
  • Art Design by Michelle Holme; Cover Photo by Danny Clinch
  • Tour Director: George Travis
  • Jon Landau Management: Jon Landau, Barbara Carr, Jan Stabile, Alison Oscar
  • HD Files are 24 bit / 44.1 kHz; DSD files are DSD64

I Heard the Voices of Friends Vanished and Gone

Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band

First Union Center

September 25, 1999

By Erik Flannigan

It’s all about moments.

For those of us fortunate enough to have seen many Bruce Springsteen concerts and multiple tours, particular shows stand out for any number of reasons, from the people with whom we attended to favorite songs that made the setlist that night. But the most indelible memories often come down to a special, unexpected moment.

Prior to this show, Bruce hadn’t played “Incident on 57th Street” since December 29, 1980, a gap of nearly 19 years, and a performance that itself proved to be a one-off on the original River tour. Hell, the song only got played five times on the Darkness tour. Three decades later, the Reunion tour became a catalyst for the revival of many dormant classics, none more beloved or longed for than “Incident.”

I can only imagine the tears of joy and quivering chins that sprang forth when Springsteen commenced his sixth and final show in Philadelphia with this magisterial reading of “Incident on 57th Street.” I would have been a puddle, overwhelmed by the caliber of the performance. While he would go on to play the song three additional times on the Reunion tour and revisit it on special occasions ever since, if Philadelphia ‘99 had been the song’s only modern airing, it would be held in the same regard as the officially released one from Nassau ‘80.

Despite a long show the night before at the Spectrum (unfortunately not recorded on multi-track due to the venue change for the rescheduled date), 9/25/99 finds Bruce in particularly strong voice. On “Incident,” he finds a connection to those vintage versions, singing with real passion, taking his time and sending the song soaring. The E Street Band is also up to the task, needing but that day’s soundcheck to nail the epic. The performance of “Incident” is not a recreation (listen to the fresh edge on the guitar tone) but a thrilling revival of one of Bruce’s early classics.

Springsteen’s vocal prowess continues and the versions of “The Ties That Bind” and “Prove It All Night” that follow ring particularly true across the board: singing, playing, intention. There are already great Reunion shows in the Archive Series, but Philadelphia ‘99 will sound fresher than you expect, as new details jump forth. For example, Jon Altschiller’s sonorous stereo mix treats us to a fantastic Stevie and Bruce vocal exchange on “Prove It.”

The show’s first half runs from strength to strength, with peak Reunion takes of “Two Hearts,” “Atlantic City” and “Factory.” “Point Blank” arrives with a captivating organ and saxophone intro in what is its first Reunion tour performance released in the Archive Series. “Point Blank” is not a song you think of as a Clarence Clemons showcase, but his textures start the song on an appropriately unsettling note, and later, Steve’s guitar solo is similarly edged.

“Youngstown,” “Murder Incorporated,” “Badlands,” and “Tenth Avenue Freeze-out” (which also bears some tasty fret work from Van Zandt) are strong as they were night after night in 1999, with “Tenth” dropping in on “Red Headed Woman” and a very sweet verse and chorus from The Temptations’ “My Girl.”

The party atmosphere extends with “a little last taste of summer for you,” “Sherry Darling,” another showcase for the musical and vocal chops of the E Street Band who are in collective top form.

The tone shifts movingly with the first full-band performance of “Streets of Philadelphia” in its namesake city. The modern Springsteen masterpiece is beautifully rendered, Van Zandt’s background vocals adding richness.

The evening enters the rarified status of hosting not one but two circa 1973 epics, with “New York City Serenade” (itself only recently revived after a 24-year slumber), delivered in stunning fashion in what might be its strongest ‘99 performance. Each E Streeter wraps themselves in musical glory: Stop it Stevie. Stop it Big Man. Stop it Roy. You’re killing us with your melodic beauty.

The set winds down in largely expected fashion, but Philadelphia ‘99 does add two additional songs to the Reunion tour Archive roster. Clarence Clemons’ great night extends to his most famous saxophone solo in “Jungleland,” which is spot on. I can’t imagine the band has played “Jungleland” better than this in the modern era. The other new addition is the show-closer, “Raise Your Hand,” played as the pure soul classic it is and celebrating the band-fan bond that Philadelphia has offered since the very beginning.

If you’re looking at Philadelphia ‘99 and thinking it is “only” 22 songs long, remember six of those tracks top the ten-minute mark on this night of epic performances. I’ve heard longer Reunion tour shows, but I’ve never heard stronger.